Europe's stem cell hub

We’re here to help European citizens make sense of stem cells.  We provide reliable, independent information and road-tested educational resources on stem cells and their impact on society. We're funded by the European Commission. Learn more.

Featured stem cell fact sheets, news and resources

Stroke: how could stem cells help?

Last updated:
22 Apr 2014

Stroke is the second leading cause of death worldwide and the major cause of disability in Europe. A stroke happens when the blood supply to part of the brain is severely reduced, often with severe effects on the body. Depending on the extent of stroke and where it occurs, about a third of stroke sufferers recover quite well, but most still experience some permanent effects and some strokes cause severe disability. Could stem cell treatments help?

Continued EU funding for stem cell research urged

A coalition of leading funders of biomedical research, learned societies and patient groups, led by the Wellcome Trust, has issued a joint statement calling on the European Parliament to continue funding human embryonic stem cell research.

The statement calls for current provisions that allow for the funding of all types of stem cell research - including human embryonic stem cell research - to be maintained in the EU's research and innovation programme Horizon 2020.

Embryonic stem cells in focus

Taking a closer look at key topics in stem cell research

EuroStemCell has been running in it's current form for four years now. In that time, we've developed a huge volume of information and resources about stem cell research -- films, fact sheets, FAQ, teaching tools and more -- in six languages.

To help you navigate that material, and find the resources and information you're interested in, we will be showcasing selections of content by topic over the coming months. This month, we're featuring embryonic stem cells.

Cerebral Palsy: how could stem cells help?

Last updated:
10 Mar 2014

Cerebral palsy affects approximately two in every thousand children in Europe, and is the most common physical disability in childhood. It causes a wide range of physical symptoms, which include difficulties walking and coordinating movements. No cure has yet been discovered. So could stem cells help?