Is it possible to donate umbilical cord blood for research or clinical use?

Image by Wellcome ImagesImage by Wellcome ImagesUmbilical cord blood is useful for research. For example, researchers are investigating ways to grow and multiply haematopoietic (blood) stem cells from cord blood so that they can be used in more types of treatments and for adult patients as well as children. Cord blood can also be donated altruistically for clinical use. Since 1989, umbilical cord blood transplants have been used to treat children who suffer from leukaemia, anaemias and other blood diseases.

There are over 130 public cord blood banks in 35 countries. They are regulated by Governments and adhere to internationally agreed standards regarding safety, sample quality and ethical issues. In the UK, several NHS facilities within the National Blood Service harvest and store altruistically donated umbilical cord blood. Trained staff, working separately from those providing care to the mother and newborn child, collect the cord blood. The mother may consent to donate the blood for research and/or clinical use and the cord blood bank will make the blood available for use as appropriate.

Cord blood in public banks is available to unrelated patients who need haematopoietic stem cell transplants. Some banks, such as the NHS bank in the UK, also collect and store umbilical cord blood from children born into families affected by or at risk of a disease for which haematopoietic stem cell transplants may be necessary - either for the child, a sibling or a family member. It is also possible to pay to store cord blood in a private bank for use by your own family only.

Read more in our fact sheet, Cord blood stem cells: current uses and future challenges

Relevant links
NHS Cord Blood Bank - includes comprehensive FAQ on cord blood donation
Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists - information for parents on cord blood banking

Last updated: 

19 Dec 2012


Last updated: 
10 Dec 2012