EuroStemCell toolkit

A growing set of downloadable, mix-and-match stem cell resources and activities suitable for a variety of educational settings. All components have been extensively tested, and come with full instructions.

Available in several European languages.

The ethics of changing genes in the embryo

From the moment we began to unlock the secrets of the genome, the complete set of DNA including all genes and understand the effects that genes can have on human health, the idea of modifying the human genome – and hence controlling these effects – has held both promise and peril. Visions of a bright future free from the sufferings of genetic disease contrast starkly with darker fears of a genetically-engineered ‘Brave New World’. 

Regulation of unproven stem cell therapies – medicinal product or medical procedure?

This article is the second in a series of posts about unproven stem cell treatments by guest authors Casimir MacGregor, Alan Petersen and Megan Munsie. Their first post took a closer look at Germany's X-Cell Center and stem cell tourism. Here they consider the regulatory frameworks governing unproven stem cell treatments in Europe, the US and Australia.

Stem cell tourism: selling hope through unproven stem cell treatments - lessons from the X-Cell Center controversy

In recent years there has been a growing interest in so-called stem cell ‘tourism’ - where a person (often companied by their carer/family) travels to another country for a purported stem cell treatment that is not available in their home country. Many advertised treatments are clinically unproven, with little or no evidence for their safety and efficacy in specific conditions.

Centre for Bionetworking organises international conference on ‘Global life science and bionetworking’

On November 11th and 12th, stem cell scientists, clinicians and social scientists from around the world gathered at the University of Sussex to discuss and debate current practices around stem cell research and therapy in an international conference organised by the Centre for Bionetworking, Department of Anthropology. Specifically, delegates sought to answer the central question of the conference: What is there between bona fide and rogue stem cell therapy?

Nature commentaries tackle current issues in regulation of stem cell therapies

Two recent opinion pieces in Nature highlight important social, ethical and regulatory issues around stem cell research. 

Research from our partners: ethical issues, stem cell research and gastroenterology

In “Human stem-cell research in gastroenterology: experimental treatment, tourism and biobanking”, EuroStemCell ethics expert and Professor Emeritus of Lund University’s Department of Medical Ethics Göran Hermerén outlines some of the prospects for applying stem cell therapies to gastroenterological diseases, and related ethical issues.

Watch the European Parliament hearing on the "One of Us" Petition.

On the 16th of April, a hearing was held at the European Parliament to discuss a petition which seeks to ban all EU funding for research or development activities which involves the destruction of human embryos. A number of EuroStemCell partners attending the hearing. The European Commission has until the 28th of May to respond and we will keep you updated on the developments with this petition.

Ethics in action in stem cell research

As stem cell research moves towards new medical applications, research teams must resolve new ethical questions. For example, if cells are obtained from a human donor, how can they be used? What type of permission has been obtained from the donor or his/her family and what are the limits of this permission? These are the issues currently being tackled by the EU-funded stem cell research project STELLAR. Ton Rabelink, Coordinator of STELLAR, describes his experience of bringing biologists and ethicists together to tackle the practical ethical questions raised by their planned research.

Stem cell treatments and ethics: discussion lesson

Last updated:
21 Jan 2013

A discussion lesson for 12-14 year olds on ethical or societal dilemmas about the use of new stem cell treatments.

Who should be allowed life-changing new treatments? When should patients be given experimental treatments? How do we weigh up the risks and benefits? And who decides?

Syndicate content