The latest stem cell news, interviews, blogs and commentary

Stem cell tourism: selling hope through unproven stem cell treatments - lessons from the X-Cell Center controversy

In recent years there has been a growing interest in so-called stem cell ‘tourism’ - where a person (often companied by their carer/family) travels to another country for a purported stem cell treatment that is not available in their home country. Many advertised treatments are clinically unproven, with little or no evidence for their safety and efficacy in specific conditions.

Interview with Graziella Pellegrini – Using stem cells to cure blindness

Professor Graziella Pellegrini is one of the principal scientists on the ground breaking, corneal repair system Holoclar ®.  Working throughout Italy over the past 27 years she is now based at the Centre for Regenerative Medicine “Stefano Ferrari” at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia

Interview with Michele De Luca – Epithelial cells and regrowing corneal epithelium

Michele de Luca began his stem cell research career working in Boston in the 80s, after training as an endocrinologist.  Alongside Professor Howard Green he worked with epithelial stem cells for the treatment of patients with burns to the skin, before moving back to Italy.  He is director of the Centre for Regenerative Medicine "Stefano Ferrari" at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia.

Researchers discover back door into the cell

Researchers at the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University have developed a revolutionary and effective way of introducing molecular tools into cells. According to Dr. Niels Geijsen, who headed the research team, this discovery brings us one step closer to treating genetic diseases:

“The difficulty of treating genetic (inherited) diseases is that we, thus far, are unable to safely transport large therapeutic compounds, for example, proteins, into cells,” explains Geijsen. “ With our new technology, we’ve found that we can do this very efficiently.”

New website takes a closer look at stem cells

The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) has launched a new website to help patients and their families make informed decisions about stem cell treatments, clinics and their health.

Stem Cells Australia's Megan Munsie, chairperson of the ISSCR task force responsible for the website expansion, describes the revamped site as “a direct channel from researchers to the public.”

UniStem Day 2016 – a look into the future

UniStem Day is an event for the dissemination and outreach of stem cell science and research, conceived at the University of Milan. It is targeted to high school students and involves the collaboration of Universities as organising Entities.

Stem Cells at Cambridge Science Festival

Hundreds of young people had an opportunity to meet researchers from the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute over the course of this year’s Cambridge Science Festival.

Every year, we use ideas and resources from EuroStemCell to develop new and hands-on ways of engaging young scientists.

EuroStemCell tools at Hydra XI Summer School

Registration is now open for the eleventh Summer School in the highly successful Hydra series on Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine.

Leading experts will give an in-depth, week-long programme of lectures, workshops and discussion groups. As well as the poster sessions, the dedicated small group discussions provide participants with a fantastic opportunity to discuss more informally about their chosen topics with leaders in the field.

Wonder of development at a school in Copenhagen

On February 2nd 2015, a class of 14-year-old students at the Prince Henrik high school in Copenhagen, had a direct hands-on experience of research in the field of stem cells and development through chick eggs with DanStem and HumEn's Professor Anne Grapin-Botton.

 

 

 

Direct reprogramming: another way of making human neurons

Direct reprogramming of cells (also called direct cell-fate conversion) is where one fully differentiated cell type changes directly into another. In the past, researchers thought this was impossible, especially for generating human neurons.  Now it has been shown to be not only possible, but also potentially simpler than other methods of creating neurons, such as creating induced pluripotent (iPS) cells to be subsequently differentiated into neurons.

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